Minimum Car Insurance Requirements in Every State

You need car insurance to legally drive in every state except New Hampshire, but the amount and coverage type can vary.

Taylor Milam-Samuel
Taylor Milam-Samuel
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  • Master’s in Education

Taylor Mlam-Samuel is a personal finance writer and credentialed educator. When she’s not helping readers better save and spend money, she can be found teaching.

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Courtney Mikulski
Courtney MikulskiSenior Editor, Auto
  • 3+ years producing insurance and personal finance content

  • Main architect of the Insurify Quality Score

Courtney’s deep personal finance knowledge extends beyond insurance to credit cards, consumer lending, and banking. She thrives on creating actionable content.

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Daniel Roccato
Reviewed byDaniel Roccato
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  • 30+ years in financial services

  • Clinical Professor of Finance, University of San Diego

Dan is a well-recognized and widely quoted financial services expert, regularly appearing in a variety of national and local media as a subject matter expert.

Updated June 12, 2024

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Car insurance protects you and your finances after an accident. If you’re a driver, it makes financial sense to have an active policy. Even beyond that, most states mandate minimum insurance amounts.

Each state’s drivers usually need bodily injury and property damage liability protection. But some states require additional coverage, like personal injury protection or uninsured motorist protection. It’s important to understand your state’s requirements and determine if you have enough insurance or if you should add endorsements to further protect yourself and others.

Here’s everything you need to know about car insurance requirements by state.

Quick Facts
  • All but one state mandates minimum car insurance coverage amounts.

  • Liability-only coverage meets the minimum requirements your state sets.

  • States determine minimum coverage amounts based on medical, car repair, and current auto insurance costs.

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Minimum car insurance requirements by state

Each state determines the minimum car insurance requirements for drivers. Here are the mandated amounts for every state.

StateMinimum Car Insurance Requirements*
Alabama
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability
Alaska
  • $50,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $100,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
Arizona
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $15,000 per accident for property damage liability
Arkansas
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
California
  • $15,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $30,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $5,000 per accident for property damage liability

On Jan. 1, 2025, these limits will increase to:

  • $30,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $60,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $15,000 per accident for property damage liability
Colorado
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $15,000 per accident for property damage liability
Connecticut
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • The same liability limits for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
Delaware
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $10,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $15,000 per person and $30,000 per accident for personal injury protection
Florida
  • $10,000 per accident for property damage liability coverage
  • $10,000 for personal injury protection
Georgia
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
Hawaii
  • $20,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $40,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $10,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $10,000 for personal injury protection
Idaho
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $15,000 per accident for property damage liability
Illinois
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $20,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident for uninsured motorist coverage
Indiana
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
Iowa
  • $20,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $40,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $15,000 per accident for property damage liability
Kansas
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • Personal injury protection, including $4,500 per person for medical expenses, $900/month for one year for disability, $25/day for in-home services, $2,000 for final expenses, and $4,500 for rehabilitation expenses
  • Survivor benefits of $900/month for one year of lost income plus $25/day for in-home services
Kentucky
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
Louisiana
  • $15,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $30,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
Maine
  • $50,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $100,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $2,000 per person for medical payments coverage
Maryland
  • $30,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $60,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $15,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $15,000 per incident for uninsured/underinsured property damage coverage
Massachusetts
  • $20,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $40,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $5,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $20,000 per person and $40,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $8,000 for personal injury protection
Michigan
  • $50,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $100,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $10,000 per accident for property damage liability for accidents outside Michigan
  • $1 million per accident for property damage liability for accidents in Michigan
  • Personal injury protection (varying limits)
Minnesota
  • $30,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $60,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $10,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $40,000 for personal injury protection
Mississippi
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
Missouri
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident for uninsured motorist coverage
Montana
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $20,000 per accident for property damage liability
Nebraska
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
Nevada
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $20,000 per accident for property damage liability
New Hampshire

Insurance isn’t required in New Hampshire if you can meet financial responsibility requirements. If you buy insurance, you need to purchase the following minimum coverages:

  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $1,000 for medical payments coverage
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
New Jersey
  • $5,000 per accident for property damage liability coverage
  • $15,000 for personal injury protection
New Mexico
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $10,000 per accident for property damage liability
New York
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident for deaths
  • $10,000 per accident for property damage liability coverage
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $50,000 for personal injury protection
North Carolina
  • $30,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $60,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident for uninsured motorist coverage
  • $25,000 per accident for uninsured property damage coverage
North Dakota
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $30,000 for personal injury protection
Ohio
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
Oklahoma
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
Oregon
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $20,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident for uninsured motorist coverage
  • $15,000 for personal injury protection
Pennsylvania
  • $15,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $30,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $5,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $5,000 in medical benefits
Rhode Island
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
South Carolina
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
South Dakota
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured motorist coverage
Tennessee
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $15,000 per accident for property damage liability
Texas
  • $30,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $60,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
Utah
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $65,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $15,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $3,000 for personal injury protection
Vermont
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $10,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $10,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured property damage coverage
Virginia

Drivers have the option of paying a $500 fee or purchasing the following minimum coverages:

  • $30,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $60,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $20,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $20,000 per accident for uninsured/underinsured property damage coverage
Washington
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $10,000 per accident for property damage liability
Washington, D.C.
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $10,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $5,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured property damage coverage
West Virginia
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident for uninsured motorist coverage
  • $25,000 per accident for uninsured motorist property damage coverage
Wisconsin
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $10,000 per accident for property damage liability
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured motorist coverage
Wyoming
  • $25,000 per person for bodily injury liability
  • $50,000 per accident for bodily injury liability
  • $20,000 per accident for property damage liability
*Insurify verified this information with each state’s department of insurance, motor vehicle department, department of finance, or state statutes website.

Types of minimum car insurance requirements

Each state sets minimum car insurance requirements. Most states require the same type of coverage, but the amounts vary. Some states require drivers to have all the coverage types below, while others only require liability coverage.

Bodily injury liability

illustration card https://a.storyblok.com/f/162273/x/e30eeeebc5/personal-injury-protection.svg

Bodily injury liability coverage pays for medical expenses and lost wages for people in the other vehicle if you cause an accident. It can also help cover your legal fees in a lawsuit. States require between $15,000 and $50,000 per person and between $50,000 and $100,000 per accident. Alaska and Maine have the highest minimums, while California and Pennsylvania have the lowest.

“Per person” refers to the maximum payout for each person. “Per accident” refers to the total payout amount for the accident. For example, suppose four people are injured, and you have coverage for $15,000 per person and $30,000 per accident. In that case, your insurance will only cover $30,000, not $60,000 ($15,000 per person for four people).[1]

Property damage liability

illustration card https://a.storyblok.com/f/162273/x/169fdfde11/liability-coverage.svg

If you’re at fault in an accident and damage someone else’s property, including their vehicle, property damage liability coverage helps pay for the repairs.

Most states require between $5,000 and $25,000 per accident of coverage. California, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania have the lowest minimum requirements, at $5,000 per accident.

Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage

illustration card https://a.storyblok.com/f/162273/x/5285c4cd74/uninsured-or-underinsured-motorist-coverage.svg

This coverage helps pay for your vehicle repairs and medical expenses when you’re in an accident and the other person is at fault but has low liability limits or doesn’t have any insurance. About half of the states require this coverage. But all drivers can add it to their insurance policy, no matter which state they live in, for additional protection on the road. States typically require uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage at the same limits as bodily injury liability. But considering the risk uninsured drivers pose, it's a good idea to buy higher limits if you can afford them.

States require between $25,000 and $50,000 per person and between $50,000 and $100,000 per accident. Maine and Vermont have the highest minimum coverage requirements.

Comprehensive and collision coverage

illustration card https://a.storyblok.com/f/162273/100x100/3220fb55f1/broken-windshield.svg

Comprehensive and collision are optional coverages. Comprehensive covers vehicle repairs due to unexpected damage from hail, vandalism, animals, and other events outside your control. Collision covers repairs to your vehicle due to hitting an object, like a light pole or fence, or another car, regardless of fault.

No states mandate this coverage, but insurers include comprehensive and collision in a full-coverage policy. And when you finance or lease a car, the lender or leasing company typically requires these coverages.

Personal injury protection: At-fault and no-fault states

illustration card https://a.storyblok.com/f/162273/100x100/0729a625be/seatbelt.svg

Most states are at-fault states, which means that the person who causes the accident is responsible for covering medical expenses for the other driver and passengers. But some states are no-fault states, meaning that each driver is responsible for covering their own medical expenses through personal injury protection (PIP).[2]

Most no-fault states mandate PIP as part of car insurance coverage, but some at-fault states, like Delaware, require it, too.

Other no-fault states, like Kentucky, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, allow drivers to choose between a no-fault policy or standard liability coverage. The following states are no-fault states:[2]Florida, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Utah.

Recent quotes for other Insurify users

Recent car insurance prices for Hyundai, GMC, Toyota, and more. Insurify features quotes from 70+ carriers including Direct Auto, Mercury, and HiRoad.

*Quotes generated for Insurify users within the last 10 days. Last updated on June 12, 2024

Rates shown are real-time Insurify user quotes from 100+ insurance companies and Quadrant Information Services data. Insurify’s algorithm excludes anomalous quotes and anonymizes personal details, then displays refined quotes by price, date, and insurer popularity up to 10 days ago from June 12, 2024. Actual quotes may vary based on the policy buyer’s unique driver profile.

*Quotes generated for Insurify users within the last 10 days. Last updated on June 12, 2024

Rates shown are real-time Insurify user quotes from 100+ insurance companies and Quadrant Information Services data. Insurify’s algorithm excludes anomalous quotes and anonymizes personal details, then displays refined quotes by price, date, and insurer popularity up to 10 days ago from June 12, 2024. Actual quotes may vary based on the policy buyer’s unique driver profile.

How states determine minimum coverage amounts

States reconsider minimum coverage amounts when medical, car repair, and auto insurance costs increase.

Cost of medical care and car repairs

States consider the costs of medical care and car repairs when determining state minimum insurance requirements. Liability insurance covers the damage and injuries that policyholders cause to other drivers and cars, so a $5,000 policy limit per person for bodily injury liability would only cover up to $5,000 in medical costs.

For example, California passed a new law to increase its minimum liability limits from 15/30/5 to 30/60/15 in 2025. Public News Service reported that when the state set the original rates in 1967, it would’ve covered a two-week hospital stay or the cost of replacing a vehicle.[3] However, medical costs have risen since the ’60s, so California increased the liability limits starting Jan. 1, 2025, to reflect this.[4]

Car insurance affordability

States may change their car insurance minimums to provide more flexibility for car owners to choose their coverage limits.

For example, Michigan changed its minimum car insurance requirements so that drivers can choose their own personal injury protection limits based on how much health insurance they have to potentially lower their premiums. And certain Medicare participants are eligible to opt out of personal injury protection coverage.[5] [6]

Learn More: Car Insurance Rate Increases

Learn More: Car Insurance Rate Increases

How to choose the right amount of car insurance coverage

It’s important to understand your state’s minimum insurance requirements and how they affect your premium. But you may want to work with your insurance company to add coverage beyond the state requirements to ensure your policy is robust enough to handle your specific needs.

Full coverage vs. liability only

“While it may be tempting to go with the bare minimum to save money, it’s important to understand the pros and cons,” explains John Espenschied, insurance expert and owner of Insurance Brokers Group. “The cons include limited coverage in the event of an accident and the risk of being underinsured. If you cause an accident and the damages exceed your coverage limits, you could be held personally liable for the difference.”

Full-coverage policies typically include comprehensive and collision insurance. You should consider a full-coverage policy if:

  • You have a loan or lease on your car. The lender or lessor may require full-coverage insurance in this case.

  • Your car is a newer model with comparably higher repair costs.

  • You live and commute in high-traffic areas where accidents are common.

  • You’re concerned about car theft or vandalism in your area.

  • Your personal financial situation would make it difficult to cover high repair fees.

Always compare quotes from multiple car insurance companies when you shop for car insurance. “Don’t settle for the first insurance company you come across,” says Espenschied. “Shop around and compare rates to find the best deal.”

Car insurance requirements FAQs

Learn more about the average cost of car insurance in each state to help you shop and compare quotes. Here are the answers to common questions about state-minimum car insurance limits.

  • What states don’t require car insurance?

    New Hampshire is the only state that doesn’t have minimum car insurance requirements. But if drivers don’t have insurance, they must demonstrate that they can meet financial responsibility requirements for bodily injury and property damage if they cause an accident.

    If drivers can’t meet those requirements, they must purchase minimum coverage amounts the state sets.[7] Drivers in Virginia can also forgo coverage and pay a $500 annual fee, but they are responsible for paying for any damages or injuries they cause.

  • What is the minimum insurance coverage most states require? What is the lowest level of car insurance?

    Most states require between $15,000 and $50,000 per person and between $50,000 and $100,000 per accident in bodily injury liability. Most states also require property damage liability coverage ranging between $5,000 and $25,000 per accident. Some states require personal injury protection and uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage as well.

  • What is the most basic car insurance?

    Liability insurance helps pay for damages to the other driver and their vehicle. Each state also mandates it. But some states require drivers to purchase additional coverage, like personal injury protection.

    A full-coverage policy provides additional protection. It usually includes liability, collision, and comprehensive coverage. Review your state’s requirements and consider your coverage needs before buying a policy.

Sources

  1. III. "Auto insurance basics—understanding your coverage."
  2. III. "Background on: No-fault auto insurance."
  3. Public News Service. "Bill on Governor’s Desk to Raise Minimum Car Insurance Coverage."
  4. California Legislative Information. "SB-1107 Vehicles: insurance.."
  5. Michigan Department of Insurance and Financial Services. "Frequently Asked Questions."
  6. Michigan Department of Insurance and Financial Services. "Michigan's New Auto Insurance Law."
  7. New Hampshire Insurance Department. "2022 Automobile Insurance Consumer Frequently Asked Questions."
Taylor Milam-Samuel
Taylor Milam-Samuel

Taylor Milam-Samuel is a writer and credentialed educator who is fascinated by how people earn, save, and spend their money. When she's not researching financial terms and conditions, she can be found in the classroom teaching.

Courtney Mikulski
Edited byCourtney MikulskiSenior Editor, Auto
Courtney Mikulski
Courtney MikulskiSenior Editor, Auto
  • 3+ years producing insurance and personal finance content

  • Main architect of the Insurify Quality Score

Courtney’s deep personal finance knowledge extends beyond insurance to credit cards, consumer lending, and banking. She thrives on creating actionable content.

Featured in

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Daniel Roccato
Reviewed byDaniel RoccatoAdvisor
Headshot of industry expert Daniel Roccato
Daniel RoccatoAdvisor
  • 30+ years in financial services

  • Clinical Professor of Finance, University of San Diego

Dan is a well-recognized and widely quoted financial services expert, regularly appearing in a variety of national and local media as a subject matter expert.

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