Cheap SR-22 Insurance in Alaska (2024)

Alaskan drivers with serious traffic offenses must file an SR-22 with the state as proof of auto insurance coverage.

Emily Guy Birken
Emily Guy Birken
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Danny Smith
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Danny Smith
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As Insurify’s home and pet insurance editor, Danny also specializes in auto insurance. His goal is to help consumers navigate the complex world of insurance buying.

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Updated May 23, 2024

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Rates shown are real-time Insurify user quotes from 100+ insurance companies and Quadrant Information Services data. Insurify’s algorithm excludes anomalous quotes and anonymizes personal details, then displays refined quotes by price, date, and insurer popularity up to 10 days ago from May 23, 2024. Actual quotes may vary based on the policy buyer’s unique driver profile.

If you’ve committed serious moving violations, you may lose your license. Alaska requires drivers to file an SR-22 insurance form with the division of motor vehicles to reinstate it. You’ll need to go through your insurance company, which will file the SR-22 with the state on your behalf to prove you have auto insurance.[1]

Quick Facts
  • In Alaska, an SR-22 requirement can last anywhere from three to 20 years.

  • Drivers who must file an SR-22 must also pay a fee to the Alaska DMV.

  • Your car insurance premiums will likely increase with an SR-22.

What is SR-22 insurance in Alaska, and when do you need it?

Major traffic violations, such as driving while intoxicated, reckless driving, and driving without insurance, pose a threat to everyone on the road. States try to protect their citizens by requiring SR-22 forms from drivers convicted of serious moving violations.

Often referred to as SR-22 insurance, it’s not actually a type of insurance policy but rather a form the state requires drivers convicted of major moving violations to carry. It’s a proof-of-insurance document that certifies you carry the minimum auto insurance requirements for the state.

In Alaska, committing a serious driving offense can lead to the suspension or revocation of driving privileges. 

“Because your Alaska driver’s license has been taken from you or suspended, you now have to have an SR-22 filing in place,” says John Wynne, owner of Alaska Service Agency.

Your insurance company could drop you after learning of your SR-22 requirement. In that case, you must shop around to find an insurer that will provide you with the necessary coverage and file the SR-22 form with the state on your behalf.

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How can you get SR-22 insurance in Alaska?

The Alaska Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) requires SR-22 insurance of drivers who have lost their driving privileges. To reinstate your driving license, Alaska requires the following:

  • You must pass the written and vision test.

  • You must pay the reinstatement and license fees.

  • You must submit written proof of your SR-22 insurance.

  • You must present proof of your birth and identity.[2]

The amount you’ll pay for your reinstatement fee varies depending on why you lost your license. A DUI or refusal (when the driver refuses to provide a sample to determine if they’re driving under the influence) will have a greater reinstatement fee than other actions that result in a suspended license.[3]

Here are the fees for license reinstatement in Alaska:

EventReinstatement Fee
One action, non-DUI related$100
One DUI or refusal$200
One DUI or refusal + one non-DUI related action$250
Two actions, non-DUI related$250
Two DUIs or refusals$500

How long is SR-22 insurance required in Alaska?

Alaska typically requires drivers to carry SR-22 insurance for three years, and the clock starts on the day you get your license reinstated. However, the length of time drivers in Alaska must carry SR-22 insurance varies somewhat depending on the type and number of offenses committed.

Drivers convicted of a DUI or refusal to provide a sample will have to carry an SR-22 for five years. After a second DUI or refusal offense, Alaska requires an SR-22 for 10 years. And a third offense comes with a 20-year requirement for an SR-22.

Finally, Alaska requires drivers with a fourth DUI or refusal offense to carry an SR-22 for life. Alaska also imposes a lifetime SR-22 requirement on drivers with an unsatisfied judgment against them. In other words, drivers who were found liable for an accident but have not satisfied their financial liability must carry SR-22 insurance for the rest of their lives.[4]

How much is SR-22 insurance in Alaska?

Filing an SR-22 in Alaska has no singular cost, but drivers required to file an SR-22 will have to pay a license reinstatement fee. This fee will be between $100 and $500, depending on what violation led to the suspension of your license.

The cost of insurance premiums with an SR-22 will vary from one insurance company to another and may also differ depending on your location. 

“All insurance companies will be more expensive with an SR-22 than without one,” says Wynne.

Learn More: Car Insurance Discounts

Learn More: Car Insurance Discounts

Cheapest companies for SR-22 insurance in Alaska

Finding the cheapest companies for SR-22 insurance in Alaska may require some diligent comparison shopping. The cheapest car insurance options can differ greatly depending on your age, driving record, mileage driven per year, location, and other factors.

Even if your current insurer continues to cover you after Alaska requires you to file an SR-22, it’s important to compare rates from other companies to make sure you’ve found the best SR-22 insurance coverage at a price you can afford.

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How SR-22 insurance affects driving record and future rates in Alaska

Your insurance company may still regard you as a risk even after your SR-22 requirement expires, and you may continue to see increased premiums. But you don’t have to simply accept higher rates after an SR-22 requirement. The following strategies can help improve your driving record and potentially lower your insurance rates:

  • Meet the minimum SR-22 requirements. The SR-22 is a written guarantee that you carry Alaska’s minimum liability auto insurance coverage. In Alaska, drivers must carry liability coverage of $50,000 per person for bodily injury with a maximum of $100,000 per accident, and $25,000 for property damage.[5] Keeping this minimum coverage continuously for the duration of your SR-22 can help keep your insurance rates from increasing any further.

  • Reduce your time on the road. Driving fewer miles gives you fewer opportunities to get into an accident. Insurance companies may offer lower rates based on your reduced mileage.

  • Consider telematics insurance. Some insurance companies offer the option of using a telematics device to track mileage and driving behavior. Your insurer charges you based on vehicle usage factors, like mileage, braking speed, and where you drive.[6] Safe driving could save you money, but bad driving could increase your rates.

Read More: The Best Car Insurance for Bad Drivers

Read More: The Best Car Insurance for Bad Drivers

Alaska SR-22 insurance FAQs

SR-22 insurance in Alaska isn’t a standard part of the driving experience, so if you need it you may feel a little overwhelmed. Here’s some additional information that can help you understand how SR-22 insurance works.

  • How long do you have to hold an SR-22 in Alaska?

    “Three years of continuous coverage is the standard,” says John Wynne, owner of Alaska Service Agency. The exact length of an SR-22 requirement can vary depending on the nature and severity of the violation, though.

    Alaska requires drivers to hold an SR-22 for longer if the moving violation is serious or if the driver has committed multiple violations. The SR-22 length requirements by violation are as follows:

    • Non-DUI-related offenses: Three years

    • First DUI or refusal offense: Five years

    • Second DUI or refusal offense: 10 years

    • Third DUI or refusal offense: 20 years

    • Fourth DUI or refusal offense or unsatisfied judgment: Lifetime requirement

  • How do you get rid of an SR-22 in Alaska?

    “Get a good lawyer and see what they can do,” Wynne suggests. “But unless the court overrules the SR-22 requirement, you’ll have to see it through.” 

    Other than appealing it in court or waiting for the SR-22 requirement to elapse, Alaskan drivers can’t do anything to get rid of an SR-22.

  • What happens to your SR-22 in Alaska if you move?

    Moving out of state may seem like a good way to dodge the SR-22 requirement in Alaska, but unless you choose not to drive at all in your new home state, the Alaska SR-22 requirement will follow you.

    When you move to a new state, you’ll have to update your insurance, driver’s license, and license plates. That means the DMV in the new state will learn of your Alaska SR-22, and depending on which state you move to, you may be required to carry the Alaska SR-22 until its original expiration date.

  • Do you need an SR-22 in Alaska if you don’t have a car?

    Going without a car may also seem like another solution to the problem of an SR-22 requirement, but that only works if you plan to never get behind the wheel of a car.

    “If you have to have a license, you’ll need an SR-22,” Wynne says. “Insurance doesn’t follow the individual — it follows the car.”

Sources

  1. Alaska Division of Motor Vehicles. "Reinstate from Financial Responsibility."
  2. Alaska Division of Motor Vehicles. "Reinstate Your Driving Privileges."
  3. Alaska Division of Motor Vehicles. "Fees for Driver Licensing."
  4. Alaska Division of Motor Vehicles. "SR-22 Insurance."
  5. Alaska Division of Motor Vehicles. "Mandatory Insurance."
  6. Alaska Division of Insurance. "Auto Insurance."
Emily Guy Birken
Emily Guy Birken

Emily Guy Birken is a former educator, lifelong money nerd, and a Plutus Award-winning freelance writer who specializes in the scientific research behind irrational money behaviors. Her background in education allows her to make complex financial topics relatable and easily understood by the layperson.

Her work has appeared on The Huffington Post, Business Insider, Kiplinger's, MSN Money, and The Washington Post online.

She is the author of several books, including The 5 Years Before You Retire, End Financial Stress Now, and the brand new book Stacked: Your Super Serious Guide to Modern Money Management, written with Joe Saul-Sehy.

Emily lives in Milwaukee with her family.

Danny Smith
Edited byDanny Smith
Photo of an Insurify author
Danny Smith
  • Licensed auto and home insurance agent

  • 4+ years in content creation and marketing

As Insurify’s home and pet insurance editor, Danny also specializes in auto insurance. His goal is to help consumers navigate the complex world of insurance buying.

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