How Long Does a Speeding Ticket Stay on Your Record?

Anna Baluch
Written by
Anna Baluch
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Written by
Anna Baluch
Insurance Writer
Anna Baluch is a Cleveland-based personal finance and insurance expert. With an MBA from Roosevelt University, she enjoys writing educational content that helps people make smart financial decisions. Her work can be seen across the internet on many publications, including Freedom Debt Relief, Credit Karma, RateGenius, and the Balance. Connect with Anna on LinkedIn.
Jackie Cohen
Edited by
Jackie Cohen
Photo of an Insurify author
Edited by
Jackie Cohen
Editorial Manager
Jackie Cohen is an editorial manager at Insurify specializing in property & casualty insurance educational content. She has years of experience analyzing insurance trends and helping consumers better understand their insurance coverage to make informed decisions about their finances.Jackie's work has been cited in USA Today, The Balance, and The Washington Times.

Updated June 15, 2022

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Insurify is America's highest-rated insurance comparison platform. We partner with the nation's top insurance companies and are licensed as an agent in all 50 states. However, the insurance experts writing our content operate independently of our partners, and you can learn more about how we make money by viewing our advertising disclosures. Also check out reviews from over 3,000 satisfied customers, our data methodology, and our editorial standards.

At some point in time, even the most responsible drivers will get hit with a speeding ticket. While speeding tickets are inconvenient, they aren’t as serious as other traffic violations. In most cases, they’re not permanent and fall off your record after three to five years, depending on where you live and how fast you were going.

Unfortunately, a speeding ticket might cause your car insurance premiums to go up. The good news is you can use Insurify’s car insurance comparison tool to access free auto insurance quotes and find the best policy for your unique situation. There are no sign-ups or long-term commitments involved.

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Quick Facts

  • A speeding ticket will likely remain on your record for three to five years or even longer, depending on where you live and how fast you were going.

  • Some states will keep a speeding ticket on your record permanently, but car insurance providers will only consider your driving history and traffic violations from the past three to five years when they come up with your rates.

  • If you get a speeding ticket, you have three options: pay it, negotiate it, or dispute it in court.

How a Speeding Ticket Impacts Your Driving Record

How badly will a speeding ticket affect my car insurance rates?

Typically, a speeding ticket will make car insurance premiums rise by about 25%.

When you get a speeding ticket, you’ll get driver’s license points on your driving record. The state you live in and how fast you were going over the speed limit will determine how many points you receive. If you accumulate too many points over a short period of time, your license may get suspended. You might face hefty fines.

In general, a speeding ticket will only stay on your driving record for three to five years. Some states, like Ohio and Nevada, however, will keep a speeding ticket on your record permanently. If you’d like to confirm the speeding ticket laws in your state, don’t hesitate to reach out to the department of motor vehicles (DMV).

Speeding Ticket Laws by State

Speeding tickets laws vary from state to state. Here’s how long speeding tickets typically remain on driving records by state and territory.

StateHow long a ticket stays on your record
Alabama2 years for points to be removed for suspension but incident is permanent on your driver record
Alaska1 year
Arizona1 year
Arkansas3 years
California3 years and 3 months
ColoradoMay reduce points but incident is permanent on record
Connecticut3 years
Delaware2 years
Florida5 years
Georgia2 years
Hawaii10 years
Idaho3 years
IllinoisUp to 5 years
Indiana2 years
Iowa5 years
Kansas3 years
Kentucky5 years but points removed after 2 years
Louisiana2 years
Maine1 year
Maryland3 years
Massachusetts6 years
Michigan7 years
Minnesota5 to 10 years
Mississippi1 year
Missouri3 years
MontanaPoints removed after 3 years but conviction is permanent on record
Nebraska5 years
NevadaPoints removed after 1 year but conviction is permanent on record
New Hampshire3 years
New Jersey5 years
New Mexico1 year
New York1.5 years
North Carolina3 years
North Dakota3 years
Ohio2 years but incident stays on record permanently
OklahomaUp to 3 years
Oregon2 years
Pennsylvania1 year
Rhode Island3 years
South Carolina2 years
South Dakota5 years
Tennessee2 years
Texas3 years
Utah3 years
Vermont2 years
Virginia5 years
Washington5 years
West Virginia10 years
Wisconsin5 years
Wyoming1 year
Washington, D.C.2 years

See More: Best Car Insurance Companies

Speeding Tickets and Car Insurance Premiums

A speeding violation can increase your car insurance rates by a few hundred dollars per year. The following factors will determine how much your premiums will go up for speeding:

  • Your car insurance company

  • Your driving record and how many driving violations you have as well as the types of violations

  • Whether you’ve received violations in the past

  • How many miles per hour over the speed limit you were driving

  • The location of the violation

Depending on your auto insurance company, you may be able to reduce the impact of your speeding ticket on your rate if you take a defensive driving course. Your provider might also have a ticket forgiveness program that could improve your situation.

Research shows that car insurance rates may go up as much as 95 percent after getting a speeding ticket. If you’ve had multiple speeding tickets or were way above the speed limit, your premium will go up more than someone who has never received a speeding ticket before and was only speeding a bit.

What to Do If You Get a Speeding Ticket

If you do get a speeding ticket, remain calm and listen to the police officer. Also, make sure that you jot down the speed you were going as well as the weather and road conditions while this information is fresh in your mind. Then, consider these options.

Fight the Ticket

You can dispute your speeding ticket, as long as you follow the procedures in your local area. If you go this route, you’ll have to design a compelling case, often with evidence and witnesses. While you can hire a lawyer, doing so is expensive and usually not worth it.

Negotiate the Fine

Once you find out the fine you’ll have to pay for your speeding ticket, you can negotiate a reduced rate. Depending on your jurisdiction, this strategy may also keep your ticket off your driving record.

Pay the Full Price

If you don't want to go to court or negotiate the fine, you could simply pay your speeding ticket and move on. You’ll likely be able to make your payment by mail, over the phone, or online. If you do pay the ticket, realize you will likely face higher car insurance rates.

See More: Car Insurance Quotes

Ways to Save on Insurance after a Speeding Ticket

Fortunately, there are strategies you can take advantage of to land cheaper car insurance rates after you get a speeding ticket. Here are some ideas.

Shop Around

Not all car insurance companies are created equal. How much they raise rates after speeding tickets varies. Therefore, it makes sense to explore various car insurance companies and coverage options after you receive a ticket.

Drive Responsibly

Do your best to drive safely and avoid future violations. In addition to other speeding tickets, at-fault accidents, running red lights, hit-and-runs, and DUIs may raise your car insurance costs substantially. A clean driving record, free of reckless driving actions, can lead to better rates.

Enroll in a Defensive Driving Course

Some insurance companies, such as State Farm and GEICO, for example, will give you the opportunity to take a defensive driving class from a traffic school. In exchange for your time and effort, you can score a discount on your car insurance.

Stick to the Minimum Required Coverage

If you’re currently paying for additional auto insurance coverage, such as comprehensive and collision coverage or roadside assistance, you may want to reduce it. Most states only require you to purchase liability insurance to legally drive.

See More: Cheap Car Insurance

Do Your Best to Avoid Speeding Tickets

While it may be tempting to speed, especially when you’re running late, doing so can cost you. Speeding will almost always take a toll on your driving record and cause a car insurance increase. In addition, it might leave you with expensive fines. If you make it a priority to follow the speed limit, you can keep your record clean and auto insurance rates affordable.

In the event you do receive a speeding ticket, however, check out this car insurance quote comparison tool. It can help you find the most affordable car insurance policy for your particular circumstances. There are no sign-ups or fees.

See More: Best and Worst Sites to Compare Car Insurance

Frequently Asked Questions

  • The state you live in and how fast you were going will determine your speeding ticket fine. On average, however, a speeding ticket in the U.S. will run $150. In addition to the fine, you can expect your car insurance rates to go up by anywhere from 26 to 30 percent.

  • If you’re pulled over by a police officer, you’ll receive a speeding ticket immediately. A speeding ticket issued by a camera or airborne radar may take a few weeks. Once you receive the ticket and pay your fine, the speeding ticket will get added to your driving record.

  • Some states will suspend your driver’s license if you accumulate too many speeding tickets in a short amount of time. It all depends on the point system in the area you received a speeding or other moving violation.

    If your state only lets you get 12 points in a year, for example, you might face a suspension if you receive 15 points in one year. You may also have to pay a fine and take a driving safety course before you’re allowed to reinstate your license.

  • If you ignore a speeding ticket and don’t pay it, it won’t disappear. Instead, you’ll put yourself at risk for higher fines, a driver’s license suspension, and other serious consequences. It’s your responsibility to either pay your ticket, negotiate it, or dispute it in court.

  • Unfortunately, even a single speeding ticket can cause your car insurance rates to go up. That’s why it’s important to be mindful of your speed and follow the speed limit at all times, even when you’re in a hurry.

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  • Data scientists at Insurify analyzed over 40 million auto insurance rates across the United States to compile the car insurance quotes, statistics, and data visualizations displayed on this page. The car insurance data includes coverage analysis and details on drivers' vehicles, driving records, and demographic information. With these insights, Insurify is able to offer drivers insight into how their car insurance premiums are priced by companies.

Anna Baluch
Written by
Anna Baluch
Linkedin

Insurance Writer

Anna Baluch is a Cleveland-based personal finance and insurance expert. With an MBA from Roosevelt University, she enjoys writing educational content that helps people make smart financial decisions. Her work can be seen across the internet on many publications, including Freedom Debt Relief, Credit Karma, RateGenius, and the Balance. Connect with Anna on LinkedIn.

Learn More
Jackie Cohen
Edited by
Jackie Cohen
Linkedin

Editorial Manager

Photo of an Insurify author
Edited by
Jackie Cohen
Editorial Manager
Jackie Cohen is an editorial manager at Insurify specializing in property & casualty insurance educational content. She has years of experience analyzing insurance trends and helping consumers better understand their insurance coverage to make informed decisions about their finances.Jackie's work has been cited in USA Today, The Balance, and The Washington Times.