Nevada Homeowners Insurance Quotes (2024)

Amica Mutual, The Hartford, and American Family offer some of the best homeowners insurance policies in Nevada.

John Egan
Written byJohn Egan
John Egan
John Egan
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  • Contributor to top brands like USA Today

John specializes in insurance, personal finance, real estate, and health and wellness. In 2022, he authored a guide on content marketing for beginners.

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Chris Schafer
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Chris Schafer
Chris SchaferSenior Editor
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Andrew Huang
Data reviewed byAndrew Huang
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Andrew HuangVP, Marketing & Analytics
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  • 12+ years in data analysis and marketing

Andrew applies his vast knowledge of analytics and insurance industry trends to help inform Insurify’s content and marketing efforts.

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Updated April 7, 2023

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The average monthly cost of homeowners insurance in the Silver State is $124. That’s lower than the monthly averages in California ($214), Idaho ($144), and Utah ($131) but higher than in Arizona ($118) and Oregon ($113).

In Nevada, Travelers ($67) and Stillwater ($71) come out on top for the lowest monthly costs for homeowners insurance.

Nick Stosic, interim state insurance commissioner in Nevada, says that recent flooding in Nevada and the ongoing threat of earthquakes increase risks (and potentially costs) for the state’s homeowners and home insurance companies. Standard homeowners insurance policies don’t cover flooding, and less than 10% of home insurance coverage in Nevada includes earthquake coverage.

Best home insurance companies in Nevada

Many top-notch home insurance companies serve Nevada homeowners. While Travelers and Stillwater provide the lowest-cost home insurance in Nevada, three other insurers win the prize for the highest customer satisfaction ratings.

In the J.D. Power 2022 U.S. Home Insurance Study, Amica Mutual grabs the top score (849 out of 1,000). American Family (842) ranks second and The Hartford (839) ranks third.[1]

The J.D. Power study is one way to measure the quality of a home insurance company. So, for some, a highly rated insurer might be best. But for others, the “best” title might go to an insurer with the lowest rates or the right coverage. Ultimately, the best home insurance company for you depends on your situation and needs. Below is a list of top insurers based on certain criteria.

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Best large insurer: Nationwide

If you consider both price and customer satisfaction, Nationwide reigns as the best large insurer for homeowners in Nevada.

Nationwide’s average monthly cost for homeowners insurance is $101, which is below the statewide average of $124. And its customer satisfaction score (816) is just three notches below the national average in the J.D. Power study.

Founded in 1926, Columbus, Ohio-based Nationwide had total assets of $270.2 billion in 2022 and total sales of $56.8 billion.

Pros
  • Lower-than-average monthly cost for homeowners insurance in Nevada

  • Near-average rating in J.D. Power 2022 U.S. Home Insurance Study

  • No. 3 ranking in J.D. Power 2023 U.S. Property Claims Satisfaction Study[2]

Cons
  • Relatively high number of National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) complaints from home insurance consumers[3]

  • Near-the-bottom ranking in J.D. Power 2022 U.S. Insurance Digital Experience Study[4]

  • Low ratings on some customer review websites[5]

Best insurer for cheap rates: Travelers

Travelers takes the top spot for the cheapest insurance rates for Nevada homeowners — an average of $67 a month, compared to the state average of $124.

Founded in 1864, New York City-based Travelers had nearly $13.4 billion in U.S. premiums on the books at the end of 2022. In the J.D. Power 2022 U.S. Home Insurance Study, Travelers scored well below average (794 out of 1,000) for customer satisfaction.[1]

Pros
  • Lowest average monthly cost for homeowners insurance in Nevada

  • One of the biggest home insurance companies in Nevada

  • Strong A.M. Best rating for financial strength[6]

Cons
  • Below-average ranking in J.D. Power 2023 U.S. Property Claims Study[2]

  • Near-the-bottom ranking in J.D. Power 2022 U.S. Home Insurance study[1]

  • Poor consumer ratings on Better Business Bureau website[7]

Best insurer for wildfire coverage: The Hartford

Wildfires in Nevada and other Western states are larger and burn more acreage than those in Eastern states, which actually experience more wildfires, according to the Congressional Research Service.[8]

When your home is damaged or destroyed by a wildfire, one thing you worry about is how your claim will be handled. To be sure, no insurer is perfect when it comes to dealing with claims, but The Hartford did perform well in the J.D. Power 2023 U.S. Property Claims Study, gaining a higher-than-average score of 883 out of 1,000.[2] The company ranked third in the J.D. Power 2022 U.S. Home Insurance Study, with a score of 839.[1]

The Hartford got its start in 1810 as a fire insurance company, so it should come as no surprise that this Hartford, Connecticut-based insurer has taught fire prevention and safety to millions of American children since 1947.

Pros
  • High consumer scores in J.D. Power studies

  • Optional flood and earthquake insurance sold in Nevada

  • Bundling discount available to policyholders who ensure their home and car through the AARP insurance program from The Hartford

Cons
  • Company specializes in serving AARP members

  • Not accredited by Better Business Bureau[9]

  • Poor customer reviews on Trustpilot[10]

Best insurer for high-value homes: Chubb

Chubb caters to owners of high-value homes through its Chubb Masterpiece program. Specialized home insurance offerings include coverage of valuable jewelry, artwork, wine, and heirlooms.

Pros
  • Broad array of coverage options for owners of high-value homes

  • High score (880 out of 1,000) in J.D. Power 2023 U.S. Property Claims Satisfaction Study[2]

  • Solid A.M. Best rating for financial strength[11]

Cons
  • D- rating from Better Business Bureau[12]

  • Poor consumer reviews on Trustpilot[13]

  • Lack of ability to get online quotes directly from company

Best regional insurance company: COUNTRY Financial

COUNTRY Financial does business in 19 states, including Nevada. Founded in 1925, COUNTRY Financial generated revenue of $4 billion in 2022. The Bloomington, Illinois-based company ranks fifth (score of 830) in the J.D. Power 2022 U.S. Home Insurance Study.[2]

Pros
  • No.1 ranking in shopping category of J.D. Power 2022 U.S. Insurance Digital Experience Study

  • Solid financial strength rating from A.M. Best

  • Lower-than-expected number of home insurance complaints

Cons
  • No availability of online quotes

  • Coverage unavailable in more than half of U.S. states

  • No Better Business Bureau accreditation

Methodology

Insurify’s team of data scientists analyze millions of home insurance quotes, and weigh publicly available reviews, claims payout rates, complaint indexes, financial strength scores, company reputations, and proprietary quoting data. Our editorial team applies this insight to inform our unbiased reviews and recommendations.

How much is homeowners insurance in Nevada?

On average, homeowners insurance in Nevada costs $124 a month. Among the factors that determine the cost are the value of your home, your location, and your coverage choices.

How your policy choices affect home insurance rates in Nevada

Here, you’ll see how your coverage choices affect your monthly premiums.

Your policy form

Different policy forms feature different levels of coverage for perils. A peril is an incident that triggers a financial loss for a homeowner, such as a fire or a burglary.

The types of policy forms you’ll find for homeowners insurance in Nevada include:

  • HO-1 basic form: Covered perils include natural disasters, theft, and explosions.

  • HO-2 broad form: Covered perils incorporate those featured in the HO-1 form as well as coverage for things such as falling objects, damage from the weight of snow or ice, and the freezing of pipes or an HVAC system.

  • HO-3 special form: This is the most common kind of coverage, incorporating all perils named in an HO-1 and HO-2 form and including any other perils that aren’t specifically omitted.

  • HO-5 comprehensive form: This form offers broader coverage than an HO-3 form does. Most notably, an HO-5 policy often provides open-perils coverage for your belongings, while an HO-3 policy frequently is limited to named-perils coverage for belongings. This means that your HO-5 policy covers your furniture, clothing, electronics, etc. for all perils that aren’t listed as excluded.

  • HO-8 modified form: An HO-8 policy, which broadly applies to historic homes, frequently covers the same perils found in an HO-1 policy.

As you can see, each of these forms varies in terms of covered perils. Before buying a policy, check which perils are included and excluded.

Learn More: What Does Home Insurance Cover and What Does It Exclude?

Your coverage level

As a rule of thumb, the more coverage you choose, the higher your home insurance premium will be. This is because you’re asking the insurer to take on more of the risk.

Choosing a lower coverage level can lower your premiums, but you should always be sure to choose a coverage level that meets your needs.

Your deductible

Your deductible is the amount of money you must pay out of pocket when you file a claim before your insurance company provides coverage. So, if your deductible is $1,000 and your insurer agrees to pay an $8,000 claim for roof damage, you’d receive a $7,000 payout from the insurance company after you paid the first $1,000.

A higher deductible typically results in a lower home insurance premium, while a lower deductible results in a higher premium. As you choose your deductible, make sure it’s an amount you can afford to pay should you need to file a claim.

How location affects home insurance rates in Nevada

Location plays a big part in setting your home insurance rates. Rates can vary a lot from state to state and even from ZIP code to ZIP code within a state. Here are four reasons why home insurance rates may fluctuate:

  • Crime rates: If you live in an area with a high rate of crime, such as incidents of vandalism or burglary, your home insurance rate might be higher.

  • Proximity to emergency services: A homeowner who lives close to a fire station might pay less than someone who lives far from a fire station.

  • Natural disasters: If you live in a spot that’s prone to wildfires, for example, your home insurance rate might be higher.

  • Property values: A homeowner who lives in a big city where property values are high might pay more for coverage than someone in a small town where property values are relatively low.

The table below shows the average monthly quote ranges for four Nevada cities:

CityAverage Monthly Quote
Henderson$101
Las Vegas$121
North Las Vegas$170
Reno$126
Table data sourced from real-time quotes from Insurify’s partner insurance providers and quote estimates from Quadrant Information Services. Actual quotes may vary based on the policy buyer’s unique profile.

What are the cheapest home insurance companies in Nevada?

The cheapest home insurance companies in Nevada are Travelers (average quote of $67 per month), Stillwater ($71), and Hippo ($78). Those quotes fall well below the state average of $124.

Your quote may be higher or lower, depending on your home insurance needs.

Insurance CompanyAverage Monthly Quote
Travelers$67
Stillwater$71
Hippo$78
Liberty Mutual$80
Nationwide$101
Midvale Home & Auto$113
Mercury$119
Acuity$142
Safeco$382
Table data sourced from real-time quotes from Insurify’s partner insurance providers and quote estimates from Quadrant Information Services. Actual quotes may vary based on the policy buyer’s unique profile.

How much homeowners insurance do you need in Nevada?

If you take out a mortgage on your home, your mortgage company will normally require you to buy a home insurance policy. Why? Because mortgage lenders want to protect their investments.

Not taking mortgage requirements into consideration, you likely enjoy some flexibility in terms of the coverage you purchase. Therefore, it’s critical to understand what a policy does and doesn’t cover and to figure out how much coverage you want or need.

Stosic recommends visiting the Nevada Division of Insurance website to check coverage differences based on policy forms from the state’s major home insurers.

“This is an easy way for consumers to compare policy language from some of the largest [insurers] in our market and be able to read what is and isn’t covered before they make their decisions,” Stosic says.

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What home insurance coverage should you buy in Nevada?

As in other states, home insurance policies in Nevada contain standard parts. They generally include:

  • Dwelling coverage: This pays for damage to the structure of your home and the buildings attached to your home. You can typically choose a dollar limit for this coverage.

  • Other structures coverage: This pays for damage to freestanding garages, fences, storage sheds, and other structures not attached to your home. This coverage amount is typically 10% of the limit for your dwelling coverage.

  • Personal property coverage: This reimburses you for the value of damaged or lost possessions, such as furniture, electronic devices, appliances, and clothing. The coverage amount is typically 50% of the limit for your dwelling coverage.

  • Loss-of-use coverage: This pays some of the living expenses while your home’s being repaired after a covered incident, such as a fire or a windstorm. Expenses that fall under this umbrella may include hotel stays and restaurant meals. The coverage amount is typically 20% of the limit for your dwelling coverage.

  • Personal liability coverage: This pays for legal expenses if you’re sued by a visitor who was injured at your home or whose property was damaged. In addition, it covers your financial losses if you’re found liable for those injuries or damage. You can typically choose the dollar amount for this coverage.

  • Medical payments coverage: Regardless of who’s at fault, this pays for the medical expenses of a visitor injured in an accident on your property or injured (at home or away from home) due to the actions of you, your family, or your pets. You can typically choose the dollar amount for this coverage.

What optional home insurance coverage should you buy in Nevada?

Some optional coverages you might want to consider in the Silver State are:

  • Flood insurance: Standard home insurance policies generally don’t cover flood damage. Flood insurance is available from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) or from private insurers endorsed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). For a single-family home, NFIP caps building coverage at $250,000 and contents coverage at $100,000.[14]

  • Earthquake insurance: Standard home insurance policies normally don’t cover earthquakes or other seismic activity. Many insurers sell earthquake insurance, which is usually added to your home insurance policy as what’s called an endorsement.

  • Guaranteed replacement cost coverage: Generally, this covers the entire cost of repairing or replacing your home. If you buy this coverage, your insurance may need to be adjusted on a regular basis to account for inflation.

  • Inflation guard endorsement: Some, but not all, home insurers sell this extra coverage. It bridges the gap between the policy limit for replacing your home (usually at least 80% of the home replacement cost) and an inflation-driven rise in the replacement cost of your home.

  • Scheduled personal property endorsement: Also known as a personal article floater, this policy add-on covers items like jewelry, computers, and antiques, whose value might surpass your policy’s dollar limits.

How much home insurance coverage should you have in Nevada?

When you’re shopping for home insurance in Nevada, consider these factors before deciding how much coverage to buy:

  • How much is your home worth? You’ll most likely want to purchase coverage that’s sufficient to cover most, if not all, of the cost of replacing your home.

  • What risks are there around your home? If your area is prone to disasters like floods, earthquakes, or wildfires, you should look at how much coverage would be sufficient to cover your financial losses if disaster strikes.

  • Do you own a lot of high-value items? If so, you should explore optional coverage for valuables such as antiques and jewelry.

No single insurance policy will meet the needs of every homeowner, as each home comes with its own risk factors and each policyholder owns different kinds of personal property. Whatever coverage you decide on, compare quotes from at least three insurers to get the best deal in terms of cost and coverage.

What are some of the biggest risks when owning a home in Nevada?

These are some of the biggest risks for Nevada homeowners:

  • Floods: Flash floods aren’t uncommon in parts of Nevada, including the Las Vegas area. In fact, flash flooding in the Las Vegas area in 1999 caused two deaths and damaged or destroyed 369 homes, according to the National Weather Service.[15] Standard home insurance policies normally don’t cover flood damage. The National Flood Insurance Program and private insurers offer flood coverage.

  • Earthquakes: States like California usually come to mind when you think of quakes. But Nevada ranks third among the states for seismic activity. The state has experienced roughly two dozen major quakes since the 1840s, according to the ShakeOut earthquake preparedness program. Standard home insurance policies typically don’t cover earthquake damage. Many home insurers sell earthquake coverage, though.

  • Wildfires: Fueled by unusually dry conditions and the spread of invasive plants, hundreds of wildfires occur every year in Nevada.[8] From 2000 to 2018, wildfires scorched 9.5 million acres of land in the state. Standard home insurance policies cover wildfire damage.

How can you save money on homeowners insurance in Nevada?

You have many ways to save on your home insurance in Nevada.

Bundle home and auto insurance

You might be able to save up to 25% on your premiums if you insure your home and your car with the same company. This is known as bundling. You can always ask an insurer whether it offers bundling discounts.

Explore discounts

Aside from bundling, you may be able to score other discounts on your homeowners insurance. For example, an insurer might give you a price break if you beef up your home’s security or if you remain a customer for a certain number of years.

Raise your deductible

A higher deductible typically leads to a lower home insurance premium. Bumping up your home insurance deductible from $500 to $1,000 might shave as much as 25% off the cost of your coverage.

Comparison shop

Obtaining quotes from at least three home insurance companies allows you to compare rates. Looking at those rates and reviewing the coverage options can help you pick the right policy for your needs and your bank account. 

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Average home replacement cost in Nevada

Replacement cost refers to how much it would cost, based on current prices, to rebuild your damaged or destroyed home. In Nevada, the average cost to replace a home is $388,540.

When you’re shopping for home insurance, you may want to consider a policy that features replacement cost coverage as opposed to market value, which takes depreciation into account when determining the value of your destroyed home.

Learn More: Replacement Cost vs. Market Value

CityAverage Home Value
Henderson$349,743
Las Vegas$321,340
Reno$396,240

Nevada home insurance FAQs

When shopping for home insurance in Nevada, you may be wondering about the cost, coverage, and other aspects of insurance. Here are the answers to some of your questions.

  • How much is home insurance a month in Nevada?

    Home insurance costs an average of $124 a month in Nevada. Your mortgage lender may require you to maintain homeowners insurance as long as you have a home loan.

    Depending on where you live in Nevada, you might consider optional flood or earthquake coverage. In addition, you may want to invest in extra coverage for valuables like jewelry and artwork. As you’d expect, added coverage almost certainly will increase your premium.

  • Is homeowners insurance expensive in Nevada?

    The average monthly cost of homeowners insurance nationwide is $227, which is $103 more than the average monthly cost in Nevada.

    Two factors that might account for the lower cost in Nevada are:

    • Age of home: The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) reported in 2021 that the median age of an owner-occupied home in Nevada was 23, compared with the national average of 39.[16] Older homes typically cost more to insure than newer homes.

    • Type of construction: In Nevada and other mountain-region states, stucco and fiber cement are the two most common types of materials for the exterior walls of new single-family homes. By contrast, wood and brick are among the two most popular exterior materials in other regions. Wood-frame homes tend to cost more to insure than stucco and fiber-cement homes, which offer better fire resistance.

  • What are the three main types of homeowners insurance?

    Three primary types of homeowners insurance are available in Nevada:

    • Actual cash value coverage pays to fix or replace damaged property based on the property’s decreased, or depreciated, value due to age or use.

    • Replacement cost coverage pays the cost to fix or replace damaged property without factoring in depreciation. So, your home would be repaired or replaced based on today’s building costs, or property like a TV would be replaced with a similar item based on today’s costs.

    • Extended replacement cost coverage goes beyond your policy’s limit to replace a damaged home. Depending on your insurer, the extended replacement cost limit could be 20% or more above your policy’s normal limit.

  • Does Nevada require homeowners insurance?

    Nevada doesn’t require a homeowner to purchase home insurance. However, a mortgage company might insist that a borrower insure their home. Even if you’re not required to buy homeowners insurance, it’s smart to carry coverage to pay for unexpected financial losses.

  • Who insures the most homes in Nevada?

    The Nevada Division of Insurance says that as of 2019, the 10 state’s biggest home insurers based on market share were:

    • State Farm

    • Farmers

    • Allstate

    • Liberty Mutual

    • USAA

    • American Family

    • Travelers

    • CSAA (affiliated with AAA)

    • The Hartford

    • COUNTRY Financial

Sources

  1. J.D. Power. "Bundle Fumble? Rising Auto Insurance Premiums are Killing Home Bundles, J.D. Power Finds."
  2. J.D. Power. "Increasing Severity and Longer Repair Times for Property Claims Test Limits of Insurers’ Digital Tools, J.D. Power Finds."
  3. National Association of Insurance Commissioners. "Results by complaint code."
  4. J.D. Power. "P&C Insurer Digital Investments Not Enough to Offset Rising Rates, J.D. Power Finds."
  5. Trustpilot. "Nationwide."
  6. A.M. Best. "AM Best Affirms Credit Ratings of The Travelers Companies, Inc. and Its Main Subsidiaries."
  7. Better Business Bureau. "Travelers Companies, Inc.."
  8. Legislative Counsel Bureau. "Wildfires in Nevada: An Overview."
  9. Better Business Bureau. "The Hartford Insurance Company."
  10. Trust Pilot. "The Hartford."
  11. A.M. Best. "AM Best Affirms Credit Ratings of Chubb Limited and Its Subsidiaries."
  12. Better Business Bureau. "Chubb Ltd.."
  13. Trust Pilot. "Chubb NA."
  14. FEMA. "Flood Insurance and the NFIP."
  15. Weather.gov. "Flooding in Nevada."
  16. NAHB. "Eye on Housing."
John Egan
John Egan

John Egan is a freelance writer and content marketing strategist in Austin, Texas. His specialties include personal finance, real estate, and health and wellness. John’s work has been published by outlets such as CreditCard.com, Bankrate, Forbes Advisor, Experian, Capital One, The Balance and U.S. News & World Report. He is the author of The Stripped-Down Guide to Content Marketing.

Chris Schafer
Edited byChris SchaferSenior Editor
Chris Schafer
Chris SchaferSenior Editor
  • 15+ years in content creation

  • 7+ years in business and financial services content

Chris is a seasoned writer/editor with past experience across myriad industries, including insurance, SAS, finance, Medicare, logistics, marketing/advertising, and many more.

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Andrew Huang
Data reviewed byAndrew HuangVP, Marketing & Analytics
Headshot of Andrew Huang, Directory of Analytics at Insurify
Andrew HuangVP, Marketing & Analytics
  • Chartered financial analyst

  • 12+ years in data analysis and marketing

Andrew applies his vast knowledge of analytics and insurance industry trends to help inform Insurify’s content and marketing efforts.

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