What Is a Homeowners Insurance Declaration Page?

An insurance declaration page provides you with key information about your policy, coverages, discounts, and more.

Christy Rakoczy
Written byChristy Rakoczy
Christy Rakoczy
Christy Rakoczy

Christy Rakoczy has been a personal finance and insurance writer for over a decade. Her work has been published on USA Today, MSN, Yahoo Finance, Credit Karma, Forbes Advisor, and more. Christy has a JD from UCLA School of Law and previously worked as a data analyst for Blue Cross and as a paralegal studies instructor before transitioning to writing full time.

Chris Schafer
Edited byChris Schafer
Chris Schafer
Chris SchaferSenior Editor
  • 15+ years in content creation

  • 7+ years in business and financial services content

Chris is a seasoned writer/editor with past experience across myriad industries, including insurance, SAS, finance, Medicare, logistics, marketing/advertising, and many more.

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Updated November 20, 2023

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When you buy or modify your homeowners insurance, you receive a declaration page. This page provides a summary of some of the key terms of your insurance policy. It usually includes details on the coverages you have, who the insured parties are, what your deductible is, how much you’re paying for coverage, and what discounts you’re eligible for.[1] [2]

You should always review your declaration page immediately. This can help you understand if you have the right insurance coverage and what risks your policy protects against. Here’s what you need to know to understand this vital page.

What do insurance declaration pages include?

Your insurer provides an insurance declaration page when you sign up for coverage, renew coverage, or modify your existing policy. Insurance declaration pages are part of many kinds of insurance policies, including home insurance and car insurance.

You’ll usually receive a declaration page via email, fax, or mail. It will be at the start of your policy contract. You may also be able to access it online in your insurer’s mobile app and may receive a copy when your insurance renews or is changed.

The declaration page, or dec page, summarizes all the key components of your policy, including the following items.

Insurance company, insurance agent, and policy period

The dec page should include the name and address of your insurer, the policy number, your policy’s effective date, and how long your coverage lasts. It may also include the contact details of your insurance agent.

It’s helpful to have this information so you know what insurer or agent to contact if you have any questions or claims. It’ll also help you understand exactly when your coverage begins and when your coverage renews.

Names of the insured

Your insurance declaration page should also specify who is insured. This will include you, the named insured, as well as a lender that has a loan on your home. The lender is included because your home is collateral for the loan. As such, your lender is also protected by your insurance.

If you don’t have the required minimum home insurance coverage in place, your lender can take action, such as putting expensive forced-place insurance on the property.[3]

Your coverages

This is the most important section of the declaration page. It explains your covered losses and your policy limits. For example, with a homeowners insurance policy, you would typically be covered for:

All the coverages should be listed on the insurance declaration page, along with the associated coverage limits. For example, if you have $400,000 in dwelling coverage, that means your insurer will pay up to $400,000 to repair or rebuild your property after a covered loss.

Look carefully at the coverage section, as this list tells you what protections you have and how much the insurer would pay if something went wrong.

Good to Know

Your declaration page may also list endorsements or options. This could include special add-on coverages, such as protection against loss of jewelry or expensive art, that you’ve chosen to purchase in addition to your standard coverage.

Your deductible

The insurance declaration page should also specify the amount of your deductible. This is what you’ll pay when making a claim. After you meet this deductible, your insurer will pay for the remainder of the covered losses up to your policy limits.

For example, if you suffer $10,000 in personal property damage and you have a $1,000 deductible and a $100,000 policy limit, you’d pay $1,000 and the insurer would pay $9,000 to cover the loss.

Be sure your deductible is affordable but not too low. The lower your deductible, the higher your premiums will be.

Your total premium

This is the amount you pay for your homeowners insurance. You should make sure it’s an affordable amount and take note of the payments due so you can plan accordingly when budgeting.

Some declaration pages also list discounts you’re claiming, so be sure to read these carefully to confirm you’re taking advantage of all possible savings opportunities. For example, if you bundle a home insurance policy and a car insurance policy, the dec page should show a bundling discount. Be sure to ask your insurer what discounts you may qualify for. You may be able to attain a discount you were previously unaware of.

How to read a homeowners insurance declaration page

You can find your declaration page at the front of your policy documents. This should come from your insurer via mail, email, or fax, or you may be able to access it online.

Look carefully through each section described above and make sure you understand what protections you’ve purchased. Your insurance agent can walk you through a description of the coverages if you don’t understand any aspect of the form.

Keep in Mind

It’s also a good idea to check for errors, particularly around the amount of coverage you have or who the listed insureds are. Once you’ve reviewed your dec page, be sure to keep a copy with your important documents in case you have questions in the future.

Insurance declaration page FAQs

If you still have questions about your home insurance declaration page, this additional information may help.

  • What is dwelling insurance?

    Dwelling coverage protects your home against damage from covered perils, such as a fire, plumbing issues, or falling objects. It’ll pay to repair or replace your property if something happens to it for a covered reason.

  • Does every home insurance policy have a declaration page?

    All insurance policies have declaration pages. Insurers should send this to you after you sign up for the policy. It’s a concise summary of all your policy terms, which you should review carefully.

  • How often does your insurance declaration page have to be updated?

    You’ll receive an insurance declaration page when you first sign up for insurance coverage, if you make policy changes, and when your insurance renews. You may also be able to find a declaration page online or request one from your insurer.

  • How do you save money on home insurance?

    You can save money on home insurance by shopping around and comparing prices with different insurers. Be sure to ask about discounts insurers may offer for things like safety features in the home. Lastly, consider increasing your deductible. This could result in reduced premiums, although it puts you at risk for higher costs if you must make a claim.

  • What do you do if your home insurance company denies your claim?

    Your insurer must provide formal notice of denial. Review the document carefully to understand why your claim was denied. If you don’t believe the denial was legitimate, you can file an appeal and ask the insurer to reconsider.

    Be sure to file an appeal within the allowable time limit specified in your policy. If your insurer doesn’t reconsider the denial, you can consult with a lawyer. You can also file a complaint with your state’s insurance commissioner, as insurance is a highly regulated industry.

Sources

  1. Maryland Insurance Administration. "Understanding Your Homeowners Insurance Declarations Page."
  2. Texas Office of Public Insurance Counsel. "What is a Dec Page?."
  3. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. "What can I do if my mortgage lender or servicer is charging me for force-placed homeowner’s insurance?."
Christy Rakoczy
Christy Rakoczy

Christy Rakoczy has been a personal finance and insurance writer for over a decade. Her work has been published on USA Today, MSN, Yahoo Finance, Credit Karma, Forbes Advisor, and more. Christy has a JD from UCLA School of Law and previously worked as a data analyst for Blue Cross and as a paralegal studies instructor before transitioning to writing full time.

Chris Schafer
Edited byChris SchaferSenior Editor
Chris Schafer
Chris SchaferSenior Editor
  • 15+ years in content creation

  • 7+ years in business and financial services content

Chris is a seasoned writer/editor with past experience across myriad industries, including insurance, SAS, finance, Medicare, logistics, marketing/advertising, and many more.

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