Missouri Medicare options include a number of prescription drug plans for residents to choose from. See the top eight plans in the state, learn how much you should expect to pay for a plan, and find answers to frequently asked questions from Medicare beneficiaries.

Prescriptions can get expensive, especially if you’re paying for them on top of a healthcare plan. Luckily, if you’re eligible for Original Medicare (Medicare Part A and Part B), you have an alternative to paying for prescriptions out-of-pocket: obtaining Medicare Part D coverage

Medicare Part D prescription drug plans help you afford both brand-name and generic drugs. They can be either stand-alone plans or added to a Medicare health plan.

Ready to find prescription drug coverage in your service area? Take the Insurify Medicare comparison tool for a test-drive to compare the plans available to you.

 

 

What Are the Best Medicare Part D Plans in Missouri?

Instead of hopping on the phone with an insurance agent to discuss a Medicare prescription drug plan, you can do research online first to leave yourself better prepared to find the right plan option. That way, you’ll have a better idea of what you’re looking for in terms of plan costs and benefits.

You can begin your research by checking out the top eight plans in Missouri below. Plans are ranked based on a number of factors, including plan costs (premiums, deductibles, and required co-payments and coinsurance) and each plan’s Medicare star rating

If you’re looking for additional plan details, check the insurance companies’ websites. You’ll also find formularies on the providers’ websites that list all the drugs their plans cover. Provider websites will also mention any insurance plan requirements, such as using preferred pharmacies.

#1 WellCare Classic S4802-072 (PDP)

  • Premium: $27.50
  • Deductible: $445
  • Rating: 4/5

This plan has exceptionally low drug costs for prescriptions in Tiers 1 and 2. Tier 1 drug co-pays are $0–$6, Tier 2 are $1–$15, and Tier 3 are $30–$120. For Tier 4 prescriptions, expect to pay 34–38 percent coinsurance, and for covered Tier 5 prescription amounts, you’ll pay 25 percent coinsurance.

#2 WellCare Value Script S4802-152 (PDP)

  • Premium: $15.40
  • Deductible: $445
  • Rating: 4/5

With this plan, you’ll pay a bit more for your prescriptions than with the first WellCare plan. Tier 1 drugs are $0–$15, Tier 2 are $7–$36, and Tier 3 are $43–$141. Tier 4 drugs require 47–50 percent coinsurance, and Tier 5 covered prescription amounts require 25 percent coinsurance.

#3 WellCare Wellness Rx S4802-187 (PDP)

  • Premium: $15.20
  • Deductible: $445
  • Rating: 4/5

The final WellCare plan on the list, this one has the highest prescription costs so far. Tier 1 drug co-pays are $0–$24, Tier 2 are $3–$45, and Tier 3 are $40–$141. Tier 4 drugs require 46–50 percent coinsurance, and Tier 5 covered prescription amounts require 25 percent coinsurance.

#4 AARP MedicareRx Preferred S5820-017 (PDP)

  • Premium: $94.10
  • Deductible: $0
  • Rating: 3.5/5

This plan has the highest monthly premium on the list, and its prescription costs are relatively high as well. Tier 1 drugs are $5–$45, Tier 2 are $10–$60, and Tier 3 are $45–$141. Tier 4 drugs require 40–45 percent coinsurance, and Tier 5 covered prescription amounts require 33 percent coinsurance. In the gap coverage phase, some Tier 2 drugs require $0–$60 co-pays, and all other drugs require the standard 25 percent coinsurance in this phase.

#5 AARP MedicareRx Saver Plus S5921-363 (PDP)

  • Premium: $53.70
  • Deductible: $445
  • Rating: 3.5/5

This plan has reasonable co-pay costs for prescriptions. Tier 1 drugs cost $1–$18, Tier 2 cost $8–$39, and Tier 3 cost $40–$135. For Tier 4 drugs, you’ll pay 40 percent coinsurance, and for Tier 5 covered prescription amounts, you’ll pay 25 percent coinsurance.

#6 AARP MedicareRx Walgreens S5921-399 (PDP)

  • Premium: $32.00
  • Deductible: $445
  • Rating: 3.5/5

Although the monthly premium for this plan is a bit lower than the previous AARP MedicareRx plan, the prescription costs are a bit higher. Tier 1 drug co-pays are $0–$45, Tier 2 are $6–$60, and Tier 3 are $40–$141. For Tier 4 drugs, expect to pay 40–45 percent coinsurance, and for Tier 5 covered prescription amounts, you’ll pay 25 percent coinsurance. In the gap coverage phase, you’ll pay $6–$60 for some Tier 2 prescriptions, and other prescriptions require the standard 25 percent coinsurance.

#7 Blue MedicareRx Enhanced S5596-078 (PDP)

  • Premium: $25.40
  • Deductible: $240
  • Rating: 3.5/5

This plan has affordable costs across the board for its monthly premium, deductible, and drug costs. Tier 1 drugs are $0–$15, and Tier 2 are $2–$21. Tier 3 drugs require 20–22 percent coinsurance, Tier 4 require 38–40 percent, and covered Tier 5 prescription amounts require 26 percent coinsurance. In the gap coverage phase, you can expect to pay $0–$15 for Tier 1 prescriptions and $2–$21 for Tier 2 prescriptions; all other prescriptions require 25 percent coinsurance in this phase.

#8 Blue MedicareRx Plus S5596-044 (PDP)

  • Premium: $65.80
  • Deductible: $0
  • Rating: 3.5/5

Although this plan has a relatively higher premium and prescription drug costs than some other plans on this list, its $0 deductible helps balance this out. Tier 1 drug co-pays are $1–$45, Tier 2 are $3–$60, and Tier 3 are $43–$141. For Tier 4 drugs, you’ll pay 45–50 percent coinsurance, and for covered Tier 5 prescription amounts, you’ll pay 33 percent coinsurance

Start comparing plans from these providers and more online today. Use the Insurify Medicare comparison tool to see the options available in your service area.

Compare Part D Plans Side-by-Side

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How Much Does Medicare Part D Cost in Missouri?

When it comes to Medicare Part D drug plans, premiums aren’t too expensive; on average, Medicare beneficiaries pay $32 per month. You may qualify for Extra Help, a program that helps members pay their premiums, deductibles, and coinsurance if you need to further lower your costs.

Medicare Part D does not have its own open enrollment period. However, if you enroll in a plan after the seven-month period following your initial eligibility for Medicare, you could be subject to a late-enrollment penalty that you have to pay each month along with your plan premium.

The costs you’ll pay for your prescriptions depend on which coverage phase you’re in. The co-pays and coinsurance for the plans above, for example, are for the initial coverage phase, which takes effect once you pay your deductible and lasts until you reach the initial coverage limit of $4,130.

Once you reach the out-of-pocket maximum of $6,350, you’re in the catastrophic coverage phase. In this phase, you’ll pay low co-pays or coinsurance for your prescriptions. The time between this phase and the initial coverage phase is called the gap coverage phase, or “donut hole.” In the donut hole, you’ll typically pay 25 percent coinsurance for prescriptions.

What Is Medicare Part D?

Medicare prescription drug plans help you cover the costs of your medications. Typically, your eligibility for a plan begins at the same time as your eligibility for Original Medicare, and you have seven months to sign up for a plan.

Medicare prescription drug plans are provided by private insurers, so if you’re interested in a plan, be sure to check the plan details on the provider’s website. You can contact them directly once you’re ready to purchase a drug plan.

What Types of Medicare Part D Plans Are Available in Missouri?

Medicare prescription drug plans can either be purchased as stand-alone plans like the ones above or be included in Medicare coverage, such as part of Medicare Advantage plans. MA plans bundle your Original Medicare coverage with other benefits like vision, dental, hearing, and fitness programs.

Keep in mind that if you’re enrolled in an MA plan with drug coverage but decide to purchase a separate drug plan, you will put your MA plan in jeopardy. In fact, you’ll be disenrolled from your MA plan and returned to Original Medicare coverage.

 

 

FAQ: Missouri Medicare Part D

How do I pick the best Medicare Part D prescription drug plan?

When picking a plan, you’ll want to consider your budget as well as your health needs. If you already use prescription medications, you can check the formularies for the plans you’re interested in to see if those drugs are covered and which tier they fall under.

If I’m enrolled in a Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap) plan, can I also enroll in a prescription drug plan? 

Yes, you can be enrolled in a Medigap plan and prescription drug plan at the same time. However, if your Medigap plan has drug coverage, then you’ll need to let your plan provider know about your new drug plan so they can remove the drug coverage from your Medigap plan. Learn more about Medigap coverage at Medicare.gov.

I receive Medicaid benefits and am interested in prescription drug coverage. Can I have both?

If you receive Medicaid benefits and are eligible for Medicare, then you may be eligible for dual enrollment in both Medicaid and Medicare (including eligibility for a prescription drug plan). Learn more about dual enrollment in Medicare and Medicaid on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services website, cms.gov.

Conclusion: Start Comparing Your Drug Plan Options Today

Getting a head start on researching your Medicare Part D drug plan options can leave you better prepared to pick the right one, saving you money if you find a great match for your budget. Considering that you likely have a ton of options in your county, it’s important to compare all the plan particulars before making your decision.

Now that you know the top plans in the state, how much they cost, and what else to look out for when selecting a plan, you have a great starting point for making a selection.

Ready to compare your plans quickly and easily online? Get started using just your ZIP code with the Insurify Medicare comparison tool.

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Updated May 11, 2021

Jasmine Fleming is a freelance digital content marketer and strategist. She loves crafting helpful content that readers can use to make important decisions. You can learn more about Jasmine at her website, www.jasminefleming.com.