How Much Is a French Bulldog? Price Guide 2023

Aly J. Yale
Written by
Aly J. Yale
Aly J. Yale
Written by
Aly J. Yale
Aly J. Yale is a freelance writer and reporter covering real estate, mortgages, and personal finance. Her work has been published in Forbes, Business Insider, Money, CBS News, US News & World Report, and The Miami Herald. She has a bachelor’s degree in radio-TV-film and news-editorial journalism from the Bob Schieffer College of Communication at TCU and is a member of the National Association of Real Estate Editors.
Danny Smith
Edited by
Danny Smith
Photo of an Insurify author
Edited by
Danny Smith
Insurance Writer
Danny is an insurance writer at Insurify. Specializing in auto insurance, he works to help drivers navigate the complicated world of insurance to find the best possible policy. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. You can connect with Danny on LinkedIn.

Updated December 19, 2022

Reading time: 8 minutes

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French bulldogs are the second-most-popular dog breed in the U.S., likely due to their intelligence, sociableness, and small, apartment-friendly stature.[1] [2] While adding one to your family can be great for companionship, this breed of dog can also be quite expensive — both to purchase and to care for in the long run. 

If you’re interested in buying a French bulldog, use this guide to gauge the potential costs you might face — as well as to learn about the breed and how to best care for it.

Important Information

Pet insurance can help defray healthcare costs for French bulldogs. Compare pet insurance policies and prices from multiple companies to find a plan that works for you.

What to know about French bulldogs

French bulldogs, often called “Frenchies” for short, are a compact breed of dog originating from Paris. They were bred to be smaller versions of the larger bulldog and quickly became popular companions for Parisians living in small spaces.[3]

Today, the Frenchie remains a popular companion dog and is known for being very affectionate, smart, and playful. They have bat-like ears, can have a range of colors, and boast a short, smooth coat. They tend to weigh 28 pounds or less and are easily trainable.[4] [5]

One thing to note about this breed is that they’re short-nosed, so they often breathe loudly, snore, and deal with other breathing difficulties. This is something to consider before bringing one into your home.[6] [7]

How much is a French bulldog?

The cost of a French bulldog varies based on where you buy it, as well as other unique factors about the dog. Purchasing a French bulldog from a breeder will typically cost more than adopting one from a shelter or rescue. 

How much does it cost to buy a French bulldog from a breeder?

French bulldog breeders often provide health guarantees, pedigrees, and American Kennel Club registrations, ensuring they’ve been bred from pure Frenchie bloodlines. 

The exact cost of buying a French bulldog from a breeder depends on the breeder’s reputation, location, and other factors. Generally, though, you can expect to pay anywhere from $1,900 to $10,000 per French bulldog puppy.

Check Out: Puppy Vaccination Schedule: What Shots Does Your Puppy Need?

How much does it cost to adopt a French bulldog from a rescue?

Sometimes, adopting a dog from a shelter or rescue organization is free. In other cases, you can expect to pay between $129 and $1,000, according to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Keep in mind — if you get your French bulldog from a rescue or shelter, there’s a chance it won’t be a purebred Frenchie. Only about 5% of all dogs in shelters are purebred.

Why are French bulldogs so expensive?

French bulldogs have long been one of the most popular dog breeds in the country. And when demand for something rises, so does its price — particularly if it’s something in limited supply (like puppies).

French bulldogs are also difficult to breed. They typically require artificial insemination and C-sections upon delivery. This can increase the cost for breeders, who pass those expenses onto the consumer via high prices.

Factors that affect the price of a French bulldog

Many factors can make a Frenchie — or any dog, for that matter — more expensive than the next.

Factors that influence the price of French bulldog puppies include:

  • Coat color: The color of the Frenchie’s coat can factor in, too. Some colors are very common, including white, cream, and black. Rare colors, like merle, blue, brindle, and lilac, are more unique and typically fetch a higher price.

  • Gender: Female dogs usually cost more than males since they have the ability to produce future generations — and future income if you decide to sell any of her puppies. 

  • Bloodline and genetics: If a dog has parents or grandparents who've won shows, have other accolades, or were AKC-registered, this can increase their price. Dogs with health guarantees may also cost more.

  • Breeder: The location and quality of a breeder — as well as the animals, methods, and facilities they use — can vary widely. You can expect a highly regarded, long-time breeder with a great reputation to charge more than someone with less experience breeding French bulldogs.

Other factors like age, size, and where you purchase your dog can also influence a French bulldog’s price.

Interesting Information:

Blue French bulldogs from a professional breeder can cost $1,500 to $4,400 or more, according to FrenchBulldogOwner.com. Sometimes their price can be double that of a Frenchie in a common color like white or black.

Ongoing costs to care for a French bulldog

The up-front cost of acquiring your pet isn’t the only expense you’ll have with a French bulldog. There will also be many ongoing costs over the course of your Frenchie’s lifetime. Here’s what you can expect to pay for various necessities as a pet owner.

Food

The cost of your Frenchie’s food depends on the brand and style you choose, as well as how much you feed your dog daily. But you can generally expect to pay around $300 per year for dog food.

Boarding or pet sitting

If you send your pup to doggie daycare, have them boarded while traveling, or hire a pet sitter, this will add to your ongoing costs. You’ll typically pay $25 per day for these services.

Toys, treats, and supplies

The typical pet owner spends just under $100 annually for toys and treats. But you also may need to purchase other supplies along the way, like a leash or collar ($60), crate ($60), or carrier ($50). 

Training

If you choose to get your Frenchie trained, the average cost is roughly $200. Ongoing classes may cost more than this, though. For reference, an 18-week class package with Petco costs $409.

Veterinary care

Routine medical costs run around $225 per year, while preventative medications, like those for fleas, ticks, and heartworms, cost about $185 per year. Dental care costs are usually much more expensive, at an average of $500 annually.

You may also face additional health costs immediately after you buy your Frenchie — microchipping, for example, costs an average of about $20. Pet insurance — if you decide to purchase it — may offset some of these costs, as well as other medical expenses.

Grooming

If you purchase supplies and groom your French bulldog yourself, the costs are about $70 per year on average. Professional grooming services will run you $300 annually on average. Fortunately, Frenchies don’t require much grooming. The American Kennel Club claims that Frenchies need coat grooming only once per month. 

Check Out: What Is Pet Insurance?

What are some common French bulldog health problems?

All breeds have certain conditions and dog health issues that they’re more prone to than other breeds, and treating these may factor into your costs as a pet owner.

Some common health problems for Frenchies include:

  • Brachycephalic syndrome: This is an enlargement of the dog’s soft palate that can cause breathing problems and may require surgery to correct.

  • Intervertebral Disc Disease: IVDD occurs when one of your dog’s spinal discs moves from its original spot, causing pain and in some cases even paralysis. 

  • Hemivertebrae: Hemivertebrae can cause your dog to develop triangle-shaped vertebrae that can result in pain, weakness, and paralysis.  

  • Hip dysplasia: This is when the hip joint degenerates and no longer fits properly into the socket. It can often occur in Frenchies that are over-exercised.

  • Patellar luxation: This condition occurs when the kneecap slips out of place. It can cause walking problems and arthritis. 

Your Frenchie may also develop issues outside of these breed-specific problems that may also need treatment.

What is the best insurance plan for your Frenchie?

The best pet insurance plan for your Frenchie will depend on what coverage you’re looking for. Some pet insurance plans cover only accidents and injuries, while others include preventative care, dental care, vaccinations, and other services. Consider your lifestyle and what activities you plan to do with your Frenchie before selecting a plan.

It’s also important to compare several pet insurance policies before selecting one. This ensures you get the best rate and coverage for you and your pet’s needs. The average accident-only insurance plan costs $239 per year, while accident and illness coverage averages about $584 annually. Additional coverages may cost more.

You should also invest in coverage early on in your Frenchie’s life — before it can develop any of the above health conditions. Many pet insurance companies won’t cover pre-existing conditions, which could leave you on the hook for pricey medical bills.

How to find a reputable French bulldog breeder

If you’re interested in a purebred French bulldog, then you’ll need to go through a reputable breeder. Asking for referrals from friends, family members, or colleagues who have bought Frenchies is one place to start. You can also refer to the American Kennel Club Marketplace or the list of referred breeders from the French Bull Dog Club of America. 

When you find a breeder you’re comfortable with, ask them questions about their practices and make sure to visit their facility before signing a contract. This can help you gauge the conditions the dog will be born into and the genetic line they come from. You can also look out for the signs of a responsible dog breeder, as outlined by the Humane Society of the United States

If you’re willing to adopt a Frenchie in need, look to the French Bulldog Rescue Network.

Is a French bulldog the right dog breed for you?

French bulldogs might be right for you if you can afford the potentially high initial investment and are willing to spend time playing and socializing with your pup, as they are affectionate, playful, and active animals. 

The American Kennel Club says this breed is good with young children, good with other dogs, and overall very trainable. Frenchies are adaptable to life with singles, couples, or families, and they don’t need much outdoor exercise.

French bulldog FAQs

French bulldogs are a unique and popular breed. If you’re still not sure one is the right fit for your household, reading the Frenchie FAQs below may help point you in the right direction.

  • French bulldogs have a life expectancy of nine to 12 years. This is slightly less than the average dog, which lives an average of 10 to 13 years.

  • French bulldogs are not big barkers. The American Kennel Club has Frenchies at a one out of five on their “Barking Level” score, indicating that the breed barks “only to alert.”

  • Frenchies don’t need a lot of outdoor exercise, according to the American Kennel Club. A short daily walk should be enough for this small breed, making them a good fit for apartment and city life, where yards and large lots can be hard to find. 

  • You’ll likely find the cheapest French bulldog at a rescue or shelter, though it may not be a purebred. Purebred dogs represent only a small portion of shelter animals, so you may find yourself with a mixed Frenchie if you adopt one.

  • The rarest Frenchies tend to be the most expensive. These include Frenchies in platinum, “Isabella,” and “fluffy” colors, according to breeder Tom Kings Kennel. The Isabella French bulldog price can run up to $30,000 in some cases.

  • A French bulldog’s price depends on a number of factors, but its worth depends on the value you put on it. If you’re looking for a pet that’s affectionate, good with children, and requires little exercise, it may very well be worth the high price this breed often comes with.

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Sources

  1. American Kennel Club. "Most Popular Dog Breeds of 2021." Accessed December 16, 2022
  2. American Kennel Club. "The Bon Vivant: How the French Bulldog Became the No. 2 Most Popular Dog." Accessed December 16, 2022
  3. American Kennel Club. "From Brothels to Royals: The Complicated Past of The French Bulldog." Accessed December 16, 2022
  4. French Bull Dog Club of America. "French Bulldog Breed Standard." Accessed December 16, 2022
  5. French Bull Dog Club of America. "Meet the French Bulldog!." Accessed December 16, 2022
  6. American Kennel Club. "French Bulldog." Accessed December 16, 2022
  7. American Kennel Club. "8 Things to Know About French Bulldogs." Accessed December 16, 2022
Aly J. Yale
Written by
Aly J. Yale
Linkedin

Aly J. Yale is a freelance writer and reporter covering real estate, mortgages, and personal finance. Her work has been published in Forbes, Business Insider, Money, CBS News, US News & World Report, and The Miami Herald. She has a bachelor’s degree in radio-TV-film and news-editorial journalism from the Bob Schieffer College of Communication at TCU and is a member of the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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Danny Smith
Edited by
Danny Smith
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Insurance Writer

Photo of an Insurify author
Edited by
Danny Smith
Insurance Writer
Danny is an insurance writer at Insurify. Specializing in auto insurance, he works to help drivers navigate the complicated world of insurance to find the best possible policy. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. You can connect with Danny on LinkedIn.