How Virginia Wildfires Could Impact Home Insurance Rates

Two massive wildfires have led to a state of emergency in Virginia, and their effects could burn homeowners across the state.

Cassie Sheets
Written byCassie Sheets
Cassie Sheets
Cassie SheetsData Journalist
  • 9 years writing data-driven content

  • Lifestyle contributor to 30+ local news sites

Cassie Sheets has a background in home and garden and real estate content. At Insurify, she translates industry jargon into insights that empower insurance buyers.

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John Leach
Edited byJohn Leach
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John LeachSenior Insurance Copy Editor
  • Licensed property and casualty insurance agent

  • 8+ years editing experience

John leads Insurify’s copy desk, helping ensure the accuracy and readability of Insurify’s content. He’s a licensed agent specializing in home and car insurance topics.

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Published November 14, 2023 at 4:00 PM PST | Reading time: 2 minutes

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Gov. Glenn Youngkin declared a state of emergency in Virginia due to multiple wildfires in the state, stoked by dry conditions and dry winds. The month-long state of emergency went into effect on Monday, Nov. 6, 2023, days after two fires — the Quaker Run Fire in Madison County and the Tuggles Gap Fire in Patrick County — broke containment lines.

Virginia homeowners may see higher home insurance rates down the road because of the fires. Homeowners in “very high” risk areas pay nearly 2.5 times as much for home insurance than those in “very low” risk areas, according to Insurify’s analysis of Quadrant and FEMA data.

Scope of the fires

The Quaker Run Fire has burned approximately 2,800 acres, including 670 acres in Shenandoah National Park. The Tuggles Gap Fire has burned 850 acres and is 35% contained. Fire bans are currently in effect in Shenandoah National Park and Patrick County.

The state of emergency order mobilizes the Virginia National Guard, which will help the Virginia Department of Forestry (DOF), the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, and other agencies involved in containment and relief efforts.

Virgnia’s wildfire season runs through Nov. 30, as fall weather conditions create favorable conditions for fires to spread.

Virginia wildfires’ impact on homeowners

Each year, more than 60 homes and other structures in the state are damaged by wildfires, according to the Virginia DOF.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) assigns risk ratings to areas based on the probability and severity of natural disasters. Most inland counties in Virginia are at “relatively low” or “very low” risk. However, some of Virginia’s most populous counties, including Virginia Beach City, Chesterfield, and Chesapeake City, are at “relatively moderate” risk.

Climate risks can affect the price of homeowners insurance. Homeowners insurance in “very low” risk areas costs an average of $1,387 annually, according to Insurify’s analysis of Quadrant and FEMA data. In “very high” risk areas, homeowners pay an average of $3,379 annually — nearly 2.5 times as much as the “very low” risk rate.

What’s next

Climate change is increasingly affecting homeowners insurance companies and policyholders. Some areas are unprofitable for insurers due to expensive claims from wildfires, hurricanes, hailstorms, and other severe weather events. In response, insurance companies have pulled back coverage in some states, including California, Florida, and Louisiana.

Average annual rainfall in Virginia has increased by 4 to 6 inches since 1950, and Richmond’s average annual temperature has risen 2.6°F since 1970, according to the George Mason University Virginia Climate Center. As the severity and frequency of climate catastrophes increase in Virginia, homeowners in the state may soon face fewer insurance options and higher rates.

Cassie Sheets
Cassie SheetsData Journalist

Cassie Sheets has more than nine years of experience creating compelling content for clients, brands, and local news sites. She started her career at Movoto Real Estate, where she transformed dry data into interesting insights for potential homebuyers. She’s since covered a wide range of topics, from pop culture news to home and garden trends.

Before joining Insurify, Cassie wrote engaging landing pages and blog posts for medical practices at MyAdvice. Now, she uses her knack for diving into the latest data and pulling out key details to empower insurance buyers.

Cassie holds a BFA in Creative Writing from Columbia College Chicago. In her free time, you can find her exploring the city with her dog, trying not to fall over in yoga classes, and petting cats at the shelter.

John Leach
Edited byJohn LeachSenior Insurance Copy Editor
Photo of an Insurify author
John LeachSenior Insurance Copy Editor
  • Licensed property and casualty insurance agent

  • 8+ years editing experience

John leads Insurify’s copy desk, helping ensure the accuracy and readability of Insurify’s content. He’s a licensed agent specializing in home and car insurance topics.

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