In almost all states, you’re legally required to carry car insurance before getting behind the wheel. Requirements vary by state, and premiums for the state minimum coverage will vary as well. To find the cheapest rates for minimum coverage, you’ll need to compare customized quotes from different insurers.

It can be tough to compare your options without the right tools. But with Insurify, you only need to enter your information once, and our artificial intelligence technology will pull quotes from multiple insurance companies in one place. You’ll be able to toggle between minimum and full coverage quotes to find a policy that fits into your budget. It’s never been easier to find the lowest auto insurance rate that meets your state’s minimum requirements. 

What is minimum car insurance?

Minimum car insurance is the minimum amount of coverage you’ll need to drive legally in your state. Every state has different rules, but most states at least require coverage for injuries or damages you cause to another driver. While minimum car insurance comes with the cheapest premiums, there’s a disclaimer: it doesn’t provide sufficient coverage for most people, and if you have a loan or a lease, you’ll typically need a full-coverage policy. You can quickly and easily check your personalized rate for both full coverage and state minimum coverage with Insurify.

What are the minimum car insurance requirements by state?

All but two states require that drivers maintain an active insurance policy, but every state has different minimum coverage limits. If you’re caught driving without insurance in most states, you’ll face legal consequences in addition to extra costs. And causing an accident or even being involved in a no-fault crash while uninsured can wreak havoc on your finances. Even in New Hampshire and Virginia, where car insurance isn’t required, getting into an accident has severe financial consequences that you’ll need to be prepared for if you drive uninsured. 

 

State Minimum Car Insurance Requirements
Alabama 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
Alaska
  • $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
Arizona
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $15,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
Arkansas
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
California
  • $15,000 per person and $30,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $5,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
Colorado
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $15,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
Connecticut
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
Delaware
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $10,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
  • $15,000 per person and $30,000 per accident in personal injury protection
Florida
  • $10,000 per accident in property damage liability protection
  • $10,000 in personal injury protection
Georgia
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
Hawaii
  • $20,000 per person and $40,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $10,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
  • $10,000 in personal injury protection
Idaho
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $15,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
Illinois
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $20,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured motorist coverage
Indiana
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
Iowa
  • $20,000 per person and $40,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $15,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
Kansas
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • Personal injury protection including:
    • $4,500 per person for medical expenses
    • $900/month for one year for disability
    • $25/day for in-home services
    • $2,000 for final expenses
    • $4,500 for rehabilitation expenses
  • Survivor benefits ($900/month for one year of lost income plus $25/day for in-home services)
Kentucky
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
Louisiana
  • $15,000 per person and $30,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
Maine
  • $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $2,000 medical payments coverage
Maryland
  • $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $15,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $15,000 per incident in uninsured/underinsured property damage coverage
Massachusetts
  • $20,000 per person and $40,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $5,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $20,000 per person and $40,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $8,000 in personal injury protection
Michigan
  • $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $10,000 property damage liability protection outside Michigan and $1 million within Michigan 
  • $250,000 in personal injury protection (Medicaid and Medicare recipients may qualify for lower limits)
Minnesota 
  • $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $10,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $40,000 in personal injury protection
Mississippi
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
Missouri
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured motorist coverage
Montana
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $20,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
Nebraska
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
Nevada
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $20,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
New Hampshire Insurance is optional, but if purchased, the following minimum limits are required:

  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $25,000 uninsured/underinsured motorist property damage coverage
  • $1,000 medical payments coverage
New Jersey
  • $5,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
  • $15,000 in personal injury protection
New Mexico
  • $25,000 per person in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $10,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
New York
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $10,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident in liability for death
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $50,000 personal injury protection
North Carolina
  • $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident in uninsured motorist coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in uninsured property damage coverage
North Dakota
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $30,000 in personal injury protection
Ohio
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
Oklahoma
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
Oregon
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $20,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured motorist coverage
  • $15,000 in personal injury protection
Pennsylvania
  • $15,000 per person and $30,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $5,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $5,000 in medical benefits
Rhode Island
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
South Carolina
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
South Dakota
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured motorist coverage
Tennessee
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $15,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
Texas
  • $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
Utah
  • $25,000 per person and $65,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $15,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $3,000 in personal injury protection
Vermont
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $10,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $10,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured property damage coverage
Virginia Drivers have the option of paying a $500 fee or purchasing the following minimum coverages:

  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $20,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $20,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured property damage coverage
Washington
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $10,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage
Washington, D.C. 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $10,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
  • $5,000 per accident in uninsured/underinsured property damage coverage
West Virginia
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured motorist coverage
  • $25,000 per accident in uninsured motorist property damage coverage
Wisconsin
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $10,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in uninsured motorist coverage
Wyoming
  • $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage
  • $20,000 per accident in property damage liability coverage 

 

Do all states require minimum car insurance?

Auto insurance coverage is legally required in all but two states (New Hampshire and Virginia). In both those states, purchasing car insurance is optional, though in Virginia, you need to pay a $500 fee to the DMV if you want to forgo insurance. However, you still maintain financial responsibility for damages or injuries you cause in a car accident. These costs can add up to thousands of dollars, so the best way to protect yourself financially is to purchase automobile insurance

If you do purchase an auto insurance policy in New Hampshire or Virginia, minimum liability limits apply. It makes financial sense to get car insurance in both states, and you may even be able to get liability insurance for less than the $500 fee you would pay the Department of Motor Vehicles in Virginia

Auto insurance may be cheaper than you think. If you haven’t yet compared insurance quotes from top companies, you may not be aware of the inexpensive premiums available to you. Luckily, Insurify makes it easy to compare rates from multiple providers side by side so you can get the coverage you need without breaking the bank. 

What types of car insurance coverages are required?

The rules vary by state. All states require some amount of property damage liability coverage, which covers damage to the other vehicle under the at-fault driver’s insurance policy. Most states also require bodily injury liability coverage, personal injury protection (PIP), or both. Bodily injury liability insurance covers medical bills for injuries to the other driver and their passengers if you cause an accident. Personal injury protection or medical payments coverage, on the other hand, cover your own injuries, regardless of who was at fault. 

Some states also require uninsured and underinsured motorist (UM/UIM) coverage for bodily injury liability and property damage. This allows you to pursue compensation from your own insurance company if you are in an accident with an uninsured or underinsured driver. 

 

What are the disadvantages of minimum car insurance requirements?

Minimum car insurance only covers your medical bills and damages to your vehicle if another driver causes the accident. If you cause an accident and your car is wrecked or you are injured, you’ll be on the hook for the repairs and any medical expenses not covered by your health insurance.

Another disadvantage of minimum liability insurance is that it typically doesn’t satisfy the requirements of a loan or lease contract. If you don’t own your car outright, you’ll probably need comprehensive and collision coverage.

 

What are the advantages of full-coverage auto insurance?

Full-coverage car insurance refers to a combination of collision coverage, which helps pay for repairs or the replacement of your vehicle if you hit another car or an object, and comprehensive coverage, which covers repairs or replacement of your vehicle if it is stolen, vandalized, or damaged by elements such as hail. 

You might also choose to get uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage even if it’s not required in your state, especially if you know there are a lot of uninsured drivers in your state. And other optional coverages, such as rental car reimbursement coverage, can help protect your finances further if your vehicle becomes undrivable. 

Full-coverage car insurance will always cost more than minimum liability insurance, but it’s usually well worth it—unless you’re driving a car that’s not worth anything and you plan to replace it soon. You can find affordable full coverage auto insurance if you compare rates with Insurify. You’ll be able to adjust your coverage limits and deductible to find a policy that fits your budget. It’s a whole lot easier than pulling customized quotes from individual insurer’s websites, so you can save time and potentially hundreds of dollars on your car insurance. 

Find Cheap Car Insurance Coverage in Minutes 

Whether you’re looking for state minimum liability coverage or you’ve decided to protect yourself with a full-coverage policy, finding an insurance company doesn’t have to take a ton of time or break the bank. With Insurify, you just need to answer a few questions, and our artificial intelligence technology will give you access to customized quotes from multiple top insurance companies

If you’re undecided about full-coverage auto insurance, Insurify can help you compare the costs of different policies. You can easily toggle between coverage amounts, deductibles, and types of coverage to find a policy that fits your budget. You might be surprised what a low rate you can find for full coverage just by comparing quotes. 

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Minimum Car Insurance: Quick Questions

Does minimum car insurance provide enough coverage?

In most cases, minimum car insurance isn’t sufficient to protect against losses from an accident. The exception is if your car is more than 10 years old and worth so little that you would rather replace it than pay your deductible to repair any damage.

Can I get into trouble for driving without insurance? What is the minimum car insurance requirement in California?

Unless you live in New Hampshire or have paid a DMV fee in Virginia, you’ll face legal consequences if you get caught driving without insurance. In California, you’ll need at least $15,000 per person and $30,000 per accident in bodily injury liability coverage and $5,000 per accident in property damage coverage.

What is the cheapest car insurance?

The cheapest car insurance for you will depend on factors such as your age, gender, driving history, and location. To find the cheapest minimum liability insurance for you, use Insurify to compare options in your area. You just need to complete a brief questionnaire, and you’ll be able to quickly identify the lowest premium available to you.

Updated March 11, 2021

Lindsay Frankel is a Denver-based personal finance writer for Insurify. Her work has been featured in publications such as LendingTree and FinanceBuzz. When she's not writing, you can find her enjoying the great outdoors with her rescue pup, playing music, or listening to audiobooks.